e-Literature

Cautions Concerning the Creation Science Craze

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Don’t let the title fool you. I’m not opposed to Creation Science. The Bible is filled from front to back with references to the natural world. We marvel at how scientific discoveries confirm truths that have been in the Bible for thousands of years. God would not have us to be ignorant concerning nature, natural science, and the origins of the universe. The study of the fallacies of evolution and scientific verifiability of the Bible can strengthen our faith. However the recent obsession with creation science among Christians and modern “churchianity” may require some warnings lest we misuse or abuse this potential tool.

Creation science is touted by many as the greatest piece in the evangelistic toolbox. With it you convince the wicked of the existence of a Creator to whom he is accountable for his sins and to whom he must repent. Is the chain this clear in reality? Creation science has only limited use in reaching the lost. The creation argument for the existence of God contains serious pitfalls that the Christian must avoid. More philosophical bolstering is required to keep the creationist from creating a mess that embarrasses himself and the cause of Christ. A popular Christian apologist, Norman Geisler, states, “This principle (the need of cause for existence) leads either to an infinite regress of looking for a cause for everything including God or else it leads to a contradictory first cause that is causing itself to exist.” We can’t get far on creation alone.

Even if a person is convinced by the creation science argument of the need of a creator he may turn to the generic Intelligent Design movement, Islam, Judaism, or any other religious or philosophical system that provides a creator to fill the need. Many people today will give assent to the truth of creation, the existence of God, the truth of God’s Word but still refuse to change their lives. They choose instead to think that God doesn’t care, is too loving to punish them, or will turn a blind eye on their shortcomings because of their good deeds. The creation argument doesn’t go far in their case either.

Our Anabaptist heritage is not built on intellectual prowess or thundering oratory and irrefutable argument. Our witness has been the quiet day-to-day belief and application of principles taught in the Bible. I am not a part of the church because someone cornered my father with dazzling arguments and apologetics. I am here thanks to the steady, unswerving lives of many saintly brethren who showed him the Bible in their everyday living.

Did the apostles need all the answer’s in Genesis books, DVD’s, seminars, and CD’s to win the 3,000? Perhaps we would do well to rely more on the Holy Spirit that aided their witness and less on our own knowledge. Remember that “it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.”

The creation science movement is fascinating to almost all of us. I certainly enjoy studying it. But is it just as fascinating and exciting to study Bible doctrine? Can we discuss with as much fervor the application of Bible principles to our lives; our dress; our businesses? Can we study church history or current church administration with as much interest and enthusiasm? These are all much more important than what scientific facts we may know concerning fossils, geology, or the flood.
What are we to think of some of the other influences this movement is having on us? Does the “Christian” content of a creation DVD make it acceptable to own or watch even when it is forbidden by the church’s guidelines or discipline? While creation versus evolution debates may be educational and interesting do they foster Christian charity? are we able to keep our attitudes correct even when the “opponent” is rude or unfair to our position? Creation seminars offer an opportunity to meet scientists and experts and learn much about the world we live in. What about some of the other things encountered at such conferences such as entertainment, music, and other things that might not be compatible with a separated lifestyle? Creation museums are a wonderful alternative to the secular ones we so often encounter. However a creation museum I attended was awash with child evangelism and turned out to contain as much entertainment as education.

You may beg to keep your creation books. Please do and I’ll keep mine also. You may long to use your knowledge to witness to the lost. Please do but with charity and a life and conversation that overflow with other Biblical truths as well. You may wish to engage an unbeliever in debate. Please do but be careful to keep a proper attitude and to pray. Remember that apologetics requires a broad base of knowledge and understanding. You may wish to keep your DVD’s. Please don’t. You may wish to attend a creation seminar. Please consult your brethren or ministry. You may wish to visit a creation oriented museum. Please do but exercise Christian discretion as at any other museum. you may wish to do many good things relating to creation science. Please do them, but always “do all to the glory of God.”

~Lake, MI